Tag Archives: biodiesel driver

2014 Ram 1500 EcoDiesel rated most fuel efficient pickup

In a recent report issued by Motor Trend, the EPA has released fuel efficiency numbers for the 2014 Ram 1500 EcoDiesel placing the full-size pickup at the top of its bracket for fuel efficiency. The rear-drive Ram 1500 with its EcoDiesel engine boasts a 20/28/23 mpg city/highway/combined, which as earned it the title of Motor Trend’s “Truck of the Year.”

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According to Motor Trend, the impressive mpg rating is “thanks to features like active grille shutters, an adjustable air suspension with an ‘aero’ mode, and a segment-exclusive eight-speed automatic transmission.”

And just to note, the B20 biodiesel-approved EcoDiesel engine is the same fuel-efficient workhorse powering the diesel Jeep Grand Cherokee.

Read more on the Ram 1500 from Motor Trend.

Hottest diesels on the road found at the 2014 National Biodiesel Board conference

This year, a few members of the Propel Fuels’ team — myself included! — were lucky enough to attend the 2014 National Biodiesel Board conference in San Diego, which happened to be timed beautifully with our Homegrown Roadshow 2.0 road trip. (Did you follow me & Em on our journey through SoCal? If not, be sure to check out Facebook to catch up on our shenanigans!)

A true opportunity to get back to our roots, the NBB Conference brings together folks from all rungs of the biodiesel industry—from manufacturers of processing components to fuel producers, vehicle manufacturers, and, of course, retailers like Propel that are dedicated to bringing those carefully processed fuels the last mile to consumers and fleet drivers like you.

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In addition to providing a rare opportunity to geek out with our industry brethren under one roof, the conference allowed to us to get to know our partners at the Center for Sustainable Energy (CCSE) a bit better. As the representing arm of the San Diego Clean Cities Coalition, the Center for Sustainable Energy is committed to increasing awareness of renewable energy programs, including renewable transportation fuels. We were happy to share a booth with CCSE’s local Program Assistant, Rebecca  (pictured below with the not-me Emily) and chat with industry folk and consumers, alike, about the advantages and availability of Propel’s biodiesel.

Plus, the conference gave a couple of us a chance to finally check out the latest diesel vehicles — and even climb behind the wheel of a few.

FORD F250
The F-series family has been a top selling truck line for over 60 years and for the past four years, the Ford F250 Super Duty trucks have proudly sported a B20 biodiesel badge. At the NBB conference, Ford brought out the F250 for the vehicle showcase and the “Ride-and-Drive.”

em_F250(Trying my best to mimic those fancy car gals we see at all the auto shows.)

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During the NBB-sponsored “Ride and Drive,” Propel’s Director of Fuel Supply & Logistics, Parker took the Ford F250 out for a spin. The standard Ford-built 6.7L Power Stroke® V8 Turbo Diesel offers 800 lbs of torque and 400 horsepower. And, of course, the B20 stamp of approval—higher mileage, better engine performance, and cleaner emissions.

F250

Having had previous experience with past generations of F250s, Parker’s reaction to the smooth handling and easy acceleration was enthusiastic. “This is a truck I could get used to driving, ” he proclaimed. The double cab was roomy with plenty of space for passengers and comfortable enough to be in it for the long haul. But, it is a work truck, and it is not small, so might not be the best about-town transportation.

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CHRYSLER JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE ECODIESEL
To say that we’ve been excited about the release of the 2014 diesel Grand Cherokee is an understatement. We anticipated its arrival since the Detroit Autoshow early last year and now, finally, got the chance to inspect the Jeep in person.

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The 2014 Jeep® Grand Cherokee’s 3.0L EcoDiesel engine has a 30-mpg highway rating, can run up to 730 miles on one tank of fuel (Biodiesel B20, of course), and can tow up to 7,400 pounds. A great vehicle for rugged roads and superior fuel economy—and the B20-approval seals the deal.

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CHEVROLET CRUZE
Winner of the National Biodiesel Board’s 2014 Innovation Award, the Chevy Cruze Clean Turbo Diesel is the first light-duty passenger car in the U.S. to be fully approved for use with B20 biodiesel blends nationwide.

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Naturally, it was at the top of our Must-Test-Drive list. At Propel HQ, many of our team members own Volkswagen diesel passenger vehicles, namely the Jetta TDI sedan, which is the German equivalent to the American Cruze. As a TDI-driver, myself, I was looking forward to trying out a US-produced diesel for comparison.

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The Cruze ran like a top, with smooth acceleration and only a gentle purr letting on to the diesel power. Some drivers might be disappointed to discover that the diesel is only offered with an automatic transmission and does not have a standard amenities package option—top of the line only, which means a bigger price tag for an already premium model. However, with a 46 mpg highway rating, beating out any hybrid on the market, it may be worth the extra cost. And as for the Cruze’s German competitor, the “Ride and Drive” guide was willing to go head-to-head with any Volkswagen diesel spec, matching or topping the Jetta TDI’s performance.

bulldozerAnd then there was this behemoth. While we didn’t have the chance to take this fancy biodiesel-friendly Cat Wheel Loader for a spin, Emily did prove that the wheel capacity is approximately one human. And the DPF filter catches 99% of all particulate matter. So fresh and so clean, clean!

– Emily S (“Shell”)

Five surprising things that can be made into fuel for your car

You may be familiar with the most common feedstocks for renewable fuel, but there is a whole host of lesser-known products that can be made into fuel for your car. Below we’ve listed  a few of our favorites.

1. CHRISTMAS TREES!

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Once January rolls around, un-tinseled and de-decorated Christmas trees line the sidewalks, waiting for garbage trucks headed to the dump. But in some cities, like San Francisco, California, discarded trees are turned into more than just landfill fodder. Instead, the trees are processed into biomass, which can be used as a renewable fuel feedstock.

Photo credit:  CINDY CHEW/S.F. EXAMINER

2. SUNFLOWERS

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Sunflowers, as it turns out, aren’t just for brightening up long stretches of rural highway or yielding seeds for snacking and spitting: they can also help power your diesel car. Those same seeds you seed scattered under the bleachers at the local Little League diamond have a high oil content that makes an ideal biodiesel feedstock. Next to solar-powered vehicles, it just might be the closest you’ll get to running on sunshine.

3. ALGAE

These little photosynthesis machines are masters of turning sunlight and CO2 into energy. Industrious producers, like the fermenting engineers at Solazyme, can capture the processing power of algae to create a super-efficient source of  renewable oil. Last year, in a successful month long pilot program, Propel Fuels and Solazyme partnered up to launch the nation’s first publicly available algae-derived biodiesel at Propel stations across the Bay Area. Hopefully, a full-scale launch is in the near future.

Photo credit:  National Algae Association

4. CORN COBS

Forget the kernel, just give me the cob! Ethanol producers are developing methods to use agricultural waste, like corns cobs and stalks, as feedstock for producing cellulosic ethanol, an alcohol-based fuel. In fact, “Project Liberty,” a 20-million-gallon cellulosic fuel plant operated by POET is slated to open this year, and the resulting fuel can be plugged right into today’s growing network of ethanol retail stations.

Photo credit:  Domestic Fuel

5. ANIMAL FATS

Mazda6-tallow

Turns out you can make biodiesel from pretty much any fatty oil including the leftovers from rendering plants a.k.a tallow a.k.a animal fats. In fact, the diesel Mazda6 NASCAR racer was loaded up with some “chicken guts, beef tallow and pork lard” biodiesel for the Rolex 24 Endurance Race in Daytona this past spring. Perhaps the bumper sticker, “My Car Eats Meat” is apt?

Producer Spotlight: New Leaf Biofuel

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Driving with Propel biodiesel in Southern California? Here’s a look at the amazing people & process behind your favorite fuel. New Leaf Biofuel based out of San Diego California has been producing high quality biodiesel with pride and purpose since 2005.  Started by a group of innovative recent college grads, New Leaf has a mission firmly grounded in their San Diego community: to enhance air quality, sustainability, and strengthen the local economy.

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The high quality biodiesel produced by New Leaf starts off as fryer grease and waste oil from local restaurants, hotels, schools, hospitals, and other businesses. New Leaf collects the used cooking oil and brings it back to their production facility, which is conveniently located right in San Diego. Once at the plant, the waste grease is filtered, purified, and cleaned up–all to prepare for the processor that turns the oil into high grade biodiesel ready to be distributed to fleets and retailers, like Propel Fuels!

“The best thing a potential consumer of biodiesel can do is to find a manufacturer who is strict about control,” said CEO Jennifer Case in a Union-Tribe San Diego article highlighting New Leaf. “We are trying to make a product that is going to be accepted in the marketplace. Therefore we have to be really strict about our quality standards. If everybody else who makes biodiesel did the same thing, we would be able to go into the next level and become a fuel that people used commonly and that states, cities and commercial fleets were confident that it wasn’t going to harm their engine.”

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The waste-grease-to-biodiesel-fuel is win-win setup on several levels. First of all, instead of paying  to dispose of waste grease, businesses and organizations with industrial kitchens have a reliable revenue stream from selling their used cooking oil New Leaf. Secondly, as a domestic (really, hometown) facility, New Leaf creates valuable industrial jobs that support the local economy. And, last but not least, New Leaf produces a cleaner-burning fuel from renewable resources for use in diesel engines across San Diego.

Creating value for business. Supporting the domestic economy. And helping to make a healthier, more sustainable community. All in a days work. Nicely done, New Leaf!

Fill up with New Leaf’s biodiesel at select Propel locations in Southern California.

Learn more about Propel’s renewable fuel producer partners.

Top 3 Diesel Commercial Van Options

Businesses looking for a smart way to keep costs down, fuel economy up, and carbon emissions low have long looked toward diesel commercial vehicles  for their fleet. And who can blame them?

1) The Mercedes-Benz Sprinter.

Equipped with a turbo diesel engine, the Sprinter has reined supreme among commercial van choices in recent years. The large sizes, custom options, and versatility make the Sprinter an ideal option, especially for businesses looking to maximize fuel economy.

JusyCleaners_Sprinter

Judi’s Cleaners uses Propel for their diesel Sprinters.

But while the Sprinter has been the go-to vehicle for fleets and small businesses looking to haul efficiently, two new commercial vans — both boasting the latest in clean, fuel efficient diesel technology — are bringing an element of much-needed competition to the marketplace. And we have to admit: these vans go in style.

2) The Ford Transit Connect.

2015 Ford Transit Connect

You may have seen these compact commercial vans delivering and moving goods around your city. Currently, all the Connects are gasoline-only (not even a flexible fuel model!). However, this is soon to change with the introduction of the 2015 Transit Connect  3.2L I-5 Power Stroke Turbo Diesel. AND, for those looking for E85 compatibility, the 2015 Transit Connect will also have a Flexible Fuel model option. Look for both options to begin appearing at a dealership near you by Summer 2014.

3) The Ram ProMaster Van.

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This is the first Chrysler group foray into commercial diesel vans since the split with Daimler (when the Mercedes-Benz Sprinter went its own way). The ProMaster sports a 3L EcoDiesel V-6 with a selection of body styles – Cargo Van (pictured above), Chassis Cab, Cutway, and Window Van. In short, an option for the contractor, the cupcake caterer and everyone in between.

It’s fantastic to see a more diverse selection of diesel commercial vehicles on the market here in the US of A. As enthusiasts far and wide can already attest, diesel drivers experience great performance with better fuel economy — and, of course, the option to run any diesel vehicle on cleaner-burning, American-made biodiesel is never a bad thing.

Does your business run on diesel? Comment below and let us know why you choose diesel for your fleet. And be sure to visit us online to learn more about biodiesel for businesses or to find a biodiesel station near you.

World Record for fuel economy goes to a diesel!

Ladies and gentlemen, once again, diesels are cleaning up on the podium. This time it is a Guinness World Record for the best fuel economy. The Volkswagen Passat TDI, driven by a two-man team for 8,122-miles across America, achieved 77.99 miles per gallon. A full 10 miles per gallon better than the previous record! And it flew passed the hybrid record by a whopping 13 miles per gallon.

VW-Passat-TDI-Clean-Diesel

Drivers, Wayne Gerdes and Bob Winger, purchased only 104.94 gallons of diesel fuel for the entire distance of their tour. The duo used common hyper-miling techniques like steady acceleration after stopping, utilizing momentum, and sticking to the speed limit. Doesn’t sound too tricky! Even without any fancy driving techniques, the Volkswagen Passat TDI is rated an EPA estimated 43 miles per gallon on the highway.

Read more about  record setting VW TDIs  and  history of their awesome fuel economy.

Photo credit: Autoweek.com.

U of M Study says “Go Clean Diesel, Save Money”

U of MMaybe we’re preaching to the choir, but a new study by the University of Michigan’s Transportation Research Institute shows that clean diesel vehicles save their owners money. And of course, choosing that diesel vehicle opens the door to using high performance, lower carbon, American made biodiesel. Even when paying a bit more for the diesel model, the Transportation Research Institute found that a diesel’s total cost of ownership (TCO) is lower than the gas version. Here’s how they put it…

“Our results show that clean diesel vehicles generally provide a return on investment in both the three- and five-year timeframes, though there are differences in the amounts of return among mass market vehicles, medium duty trucks, and luxury vehicles,” authors Bruce M. Belzowski and Paul Green, assistant research scientists with UMTRI, state in their report. “The estimates of savings for three and five years of ownership vary from a low of $67 in three years to a high of $15,619 in five years, but most of the savings are in the $2,000 to $6,000 range, which also include the extra cost that is usually added to the diesel version of a vehicle.”

Read more at http://www.biodieselmagazine.com/articles/9232/study-shows-diesels-save-owners-money-over-gasoline-versions.